Jeanne E. Pemberton*

Regents Professor Accepting Students

Jeanne E. Pemberton*

Regents Professor Accepting Students

Degrees and Appointments 

  • Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • B.S. University of Delaware (Chemistry)
  • B.A. University of Delaware (Biology)

Awards and Honors

  • American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Spectrochemical Analysis, 2021
  • Executive Editor, Analytical Chemistry, 2019-present
  • Galileo Circle Fellow, College of Science, University of Arizona, 2013
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2009
  • Fellow, American Chemical Society (inaugural class), 2009
  • Associate Editor, Analytical Chemistry, 2008-present
  • Regents Professor, University of Arizona, 2005-present
  • American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry, 2004
  • Co-Editor, Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry, 2012-2020

Research Specialties: Chemical Reaction Dynamics/Kinetics/Interactions​, Energy Science, Instrument Development, Materials and Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy/Molecular Structure, Surface and Solid State, Synthesis/Synthetic Methods Development

Research

The Chemistry of Organic Semiconductors and their Interfaces in Molecular Electronic & Photonic Devices

The interfacial regions between phases are sites of critical importance in many relevant processes and technologies. Despite decades of intense study, our understanding of the chemistry of interfacial and surface processes at the molecular level is still only modestly developed. Thus, the development of adequate tools with which to study surface and interfacial chemistry and elucidation of the molecular details of such complex chemistry represent two of the most exciting frontiers of modern measurement science. Our research seeks to develop an understanding of such chemistry in several technologically important areas including organic semiconductor-based devices. Methodologies employed for these efforts include surface vibrational spectroscopies, electrochemistry, surface electron spectroscopies, work function measurements, ellipsometry, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, and the scanning probe microscopies (AFM and STM). These methods are supplemented by more conventional chemical measurement tools (e.g. mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy) as needed for complete characterization of relevant solution and interfacial systems. Read More.

Faculty Tenure Track Faculty Analytical Chemistry Physical Chemistry