• Mosquito Eggs Without Eggshells Disrupt the Ability to Reproduce

    Story by Roger L. Miesfeld and Jun Isoe | Special to the Arizona Daily Star

    Up to 40 percent of the world’s population now lives in areas where Dengue virus-transmitting mosquitoes coexist with humans. Moreover, the Zika virus, also transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, has emerged as... Read More

  • University of Arizona Funds Early-Stage Inventions for Market Readiness

    Story by Paul Tumarkin

    Photo: Douglas Loy, PhD., shown here presenting at an NSF I-Corps session, was awarded funds to further develop a non-toxic, long-lasting sunscreen based on nanoparticles. Photo credit: Paul Tumarkin/Tech Launch Arizona... Read More

  • Michael Marty named a 2017 Bisgrove Scholar

    Science Foundation Arizona, or SFAz, recently announced its 2017 SFAz Bisgrove Scholars Awards, with four of the five state recipients coming from the University of Arizona. UA researchers Michael Marty, Jianqiang Cheng, Luke McGuire and John Schaibley each will receive $200,000 in support of... Read More

Mosquito Eggs Without Eggshells Disrupt the Ability to Reproduce

University of Arizona Funds Early-Stage Inventions for Market Readiness

Michael Marty named a 2017 Bisgrove Scholar

Mosquito Eggs Without Eggshells Disrupt the Ability to Reproduce

University of Arizona Funds Early-Stage Inventions for Market Readiness

Michael Marty named a 2017 Bisgrove Scholar

Spotlights

Faculty

Winners of the 2016 Catalyst Awards for Outstanding Entrepreneurial Activities in the Chemical Sciences, which was sponsored this year by Nguyen & Tarbet Patent Law and Tech Launch Arizona, are as follows:

Research

Transfer of charges across the interface between an organic semiconductor and an optically transparent, conductive oxide (TCO) electrode, such as indium-tin oxide (ITO), is a fundamental process in the operation of organic solar cells (OSCs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs).

Students

Congratulations to Jonathan Sanchez, who was selected to receive the 2017 Herbert E. Carter Award. This award is presented to a graduate student, who early in his or her graduate career, has demonstrated outstanding potential for becoming an inquisitive, creative, independent scientist.